Posted by Philip Dennesen on 2/19/2021

Two of the most important ingredients in a successful house-marketing campaign are competitive pricing and making a great first impression on prospective buyers. Although your real estate agent can assist in achieving both of those goals, keeping your home in "show ready" condition will be up to you and your family.

When your home is actively being shown, the process is not unlike a job interview. The main similarity is that you don't get a second chance to make a good first impression. Potential buyers have a mindset that's similar to that of a hiring manager: They are intensely focused on making the right decision. Since the last thing they want to do is make the wrong choice (or a less-than-optimal choice) it's up to you -- the home seller-- to present your home in its best possible light.

Other than keeping your home squeaky clean and your lawn looking as manicured as possible, it's also to your benefit to reduce clutter. A house that's filled with clutter will definitely send the wrong message to prospective buyers searching for their next home. Clutter takes many forms, so it often requires a concerted effort to identify and remedy it. Here are a few key areas to focus on:

Furniture clutter: Having too much furniture in a room or entryway can give visitors the impression that your home is cramped, too small, or disorganized. If you've had a tendency to add furniture to your home, over time -- without putting some pieces in storage -- then you may have inadvertently created a cluttered "look and feel" to your living space

Surface clutter: Have you ever noticed how things that belong in drawers, cabinets, and recycling bins often end up on tables, counter tops, and bookshelves? If that's taking place in your home, rest assured you're not alone! However, if you're preparing to put your home on the market, you'll make a much better impression on potential buyers if you remove as much surface clutter as possible.

Storage-area clutter: Although there's a lot of truth to the saying "Out of sight, out of mind," that usually doesn't apply to preparing your home for the real estate market! Serious house hunters are pretty thorough, and are generally going to glance in closets, basements, attics, and garages. So if you simply move your clutter to another part of the house, it will still be noticed! Granted, your clutter will be less prominent in storage areas, but it will still have a detracting effect on the overall impression your home makes. The solution involves a combination of strategies, including selling or donating unwanted belongings. In some cases, you might even consider renting a dumpster or calling a reasonably priced junk-hauling service to get rid of things you don't want and can't donate, sell, or give away.

It's not always easy to be objective when staging your home or evaluating its marketability, so an experienced real estate agent can provide you with invaluable guidance, advice, negotiating help, and marketing assistance





Posted by Philip Dennesen on 5/15/2020

Your kitchen is an often used room and can become cluttered very quickly. There are plenty of strategies that you can use to keep the room in order. Below, youíll find tips that will help you to keep your kitchen decluttered and your supplies organized once and for all! 


Make Space For Storage


This sounds like an obvious need in any room of the house, but the kitchen is a place where you need ample storage. There are a few ways to do this. Outside of your cabinets, you can install freestanding storage units, like shelving or extra cabinets. Even an armoire can help you to have a space to beautifully display your dishes. 


Under your sink, you can keep your most frequently used items like soap, sponges, and detergent in easy to access solutions. Either install a small turntable, or simple get bins that can be labeled and pulled out as needed. This will keep everything you need together neat and tidy. It will be difficult to actually disorganize this space once you have completed this small task. 


Coffee Time


What would a kitchen be without coffee? If you brew a cup of joe every morning, youíll want easy access to coffee supplies. Dedicate a space next to the coffeemaker where youíll keep the coffee, mugs, beans, and other supplies. You can even keep your travel mugs near this space within reach when youíre running out the door. If thereís little room on the counter, hang hooks on the wall to keep coffee mugs and travel mugs out of the way.


Tackle The Trash And Recycling


Thereís nothing worse than having trash and recycling all over your kitchen. Keep these items concealed in dedicated cabinets. The perfect place for the trash and the recycling is next to the sink since thatís the most convenient location for the trash to be in. 


The recycling will follow the same pattern as it needs to be rinsed out and ready to go outside in the bins.  


Keep The Family Organized


A kitchen is a great place for you to have a center of communication for your family. This is where a bulletin board can be placed with important documents. A calendar listing all of the familyís activities and appointments can be hung for everyoneís reference. This area make use of a small space that would otherwise be wasted in your kitchen. It also serves a dual purpose in keeping the family organized.


Small changes can make a big difference in the kitchen when it comes to clutter, storage, and organization. Once you get started, keeping the clutter at bay can be very easy.




Tags: kitchen   orgainze  


Posted by Philip Dennesen on 9/27/2019

No matter how you look at it, decluttering a home is a big job, yet the rewards are very promising. For some people, however, the challenge is not knowing what to do. Here a few easy ways that you can start getting rid of clutter in your own home.

Your medicine drawer is probably one of the most natural places to begin decluttering. Throw away all expired drugs, skin care products, toiletries and every other thing that you don't use any longer. Keep the most frequently used items directly in front, and at eye level, so you quickly access them next time. 

Now you can move to your bedroom. Look for items that you no longer use, such as bad chargers, pens that no longer write or even old shoelaces. Arrange your bed and fold all articles of clothing strewn about. Go through your cabinets and dressers, one drawer after the other. Take out clothes that you no longer wear and bag them for donation. Tackle your dressing table and go through the items there, some things are probably not going to be used anymore, so you should discard them. The goal decluttering is to make your home as light as possible. 

If you have a reading table, you want to put back your books in their proper places on your bookshelf. Do away with irrelevant papers like old brochures, newsletters, and pamphlets. If you think that you may need some information there, take a picture of it and save it to the cloud.

Having earned some momentum, you can move to your kitchen, which is often harder to declutter as it is the center of so many activities. Thoroughly assess each area of the kitchen and put everything back where it belongs. That includes items like knives, work boards and so on.

Open up your drawers and cabinets and do away with all unusable items. Look for things that you don't use but keep for some sentimental reasons and pack them up to donate if you don't feel comfortable about throwing them out. Keep things that you don't need in storage.

Finally, you are ready to move to the living room. Your living room will probably require more regular decluttering than any other part of your home. Put away things that you donít need, such as magazines and phone chargers. Assess the electronic and sound system too, store away some of the things you donít use and donate what you donít need. If you need ideas on where to donate, run a web search of charities in your locality to find out too for options.